Capital Visit

markMarc Lamczyk, U of I Extension Program Coordinator (pictured top left) arrived back in Illinois after spending two days in Washington D.C. with the IFB Leaders to Washington. The group arrived at the Capitol and visited with Senator Dick Durbin and Congressman Darin LaHood, met with Crop Life America, and took time to visit the monuments as well.  Marc will be meeting with the Franklin County Board of Directors and reporting on his trip.

Leaders Attend Discussion Meeting

meetFranklin County Farm Bureau Young Leaders, Brad Browning, Tara Brown and Amy Kovarik are shown with District 17 Young Leader Chairman Kendall Browning at the 2016 District Discussion Meet at the Edwards County Farm Bureau on August 30, 2016. Brad earned 1st Place honors, Tara received 4th Place and Amy received 3rd Place. Second place went to a contestant from Edwards County. Brad is automatically eligible to attend the IAA Annual Meeting in Chicago, in December, to participate in the State Discussion Meet. Amy is the first Alternate, so if the second place person decides not to attend the State Meet, she will then go and participate. This was the first year for both Tara and Amy and we are proud of all three contestants.

Manager’s Article September 16, 2016

GayWEST CITY FALL FESTIVAL – HARVEST – UTAH CONCEAL AND CARRY
September 16, 2016
Gay Bowlin, Manager

Join us tomorrow at the West City Fall Festival – Young Leaders will be there from noon to 4 serving hot dogs, chips and drinks and Ag in the Classroom Coordinator Melissa Lamczyk will be on hand with animals that kids can interact with. Benton/West City Chamber will be serving Uncle Joe’s BBQ from 4-7. We will also have antique tractors and newer tractors to see along with inflatable bounce houses, hay rides and horse & buggy rides, craft booths and much more. Event goes from noon to 10pm.
There are some Franklin County farmers who are cutting corn but there are more that are not in the fields yet. With the forecast calling for rain today and tomorrow it will take a little while before they are able to be in the fields and get the crops out. Many are still wondering what the harvest will be like this year.
Rain over the past week slowed down some field activities. Statewide, the average temperature was 74.7 degrees, 4.7 degrees above normal. Precipitation averaged 1.99 inches, 1.3 inches above normal. There were 4.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 11.
Topsoil moisture supply was rated at one percent very short, two percent short, 82 percent adequate, and 15 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated at one percent very short, four percent short, 82 percent adequate, and 13 percent surplus.
Corn dented was 91 percent, compared to 93 percent last year. Corn mature increased to 42 percent, compared to 45 percent for the five-year average. Corn harvest was three percent complete, compared to seven percent for the five-year average. Corn condition was rated one percent very poor, two percent poor, 12 percent fair, 59 percent good, and 26 percent excellent.
Soybeans coloring jumped to 50 percent, compared to 49 percent for the five-year average. Soybeans dropping leaves was at 14 percent, compared to 26 percent last year. Soybean condition was rated two percent very poor, four percent poor, 15 percent fair, 58 percent good, and 21 percent excellent.
Pasture and range condition was rated one percent very poor, two percent poor, 15 percent fair, 57 percent good, and 25 percent excellent.
Utah Non-Resident Concealed Carry Permit Training on October 29th, 2016 8:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. $65.00 to Farm Bureau Members – $85.00 for non-Farm Bureau Members. No FOID Card Needed, No Written Tests, No Shooting Qualification
Course is all classroom theory, no firearms qualification involved for Utah Non-Resident Concealed Carry Permit. Travelers it is time to add this one to your wallet or purse. This is the most popular concealed carry permit in the nation and is recognized in 32 States, including all Illinois’ contiguous states.  The permit costs only $49.00 and  is good for 5 years and the renewal cost is only $15.00! We are offering the entire permit package from start to finish in a one session 4 hour course, with application, finger printing, notary and photo for $65.00 for Farm Bureau Members or $85.00 for non-members. Participant must bring their Illinois drivers license.  Payment and registration can be made by credit card at  http://www.extremeexigency.com/services.html. Payment can also be made the day of training by cash/checks or money order. If you have any further questions please call 314-925-0869.  To register call the Franklin County Farm Bureau at 618-435-3616 or 314-925-0869.  Register early due to limited seating.
Disclaimer Utah non-resident permit is not honored in the State of Illinois.  Illinois residents are still required to obtain an Illinois Concealed Carry permit to legally carry a concealed firearm in Illinois.
Remember we are farmers working together. If we can help let us know.

Manager’s Article September 8, 2016

GayUtah Non-Resident Concealed Carry Permit Training on October 29th, 2016 8:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. $65.00 to Farm Bureau Members – $85.00 for non-Farm Bureau Members. No FOID Card Needed, No Written Tests, No Shooting Qualification
Course is all classroom theory, no firearms qualification involved for Utah Non-Resident Concealed Carry Permit. Travelers it is time to add this one to your wallet or purse. This is the most popular concealed carry permit in the nation and is recognized in 32 States, including all Illinois’ contiguous states.  The permit costs only $49.00 and  is good for 5 years and the renewal cost is only $15.00! We are offering the entire permit package from start to finish in a one session 4 hour course, with application, finger printing, notary and photo for $65.00 for Farm Bureau Members or $85.00 for non-members. Participant must bring their Illinois drivers license.  Payment and registration can be made by credit card at  http://www.extremeexigency.com/services.html. Payment can also be made the day of training by cash/checks or money order. If you have any further questions please call 314-925-0869.  To register call the Franklin County Farm Bureau at 618-435-3616 or 314-925-0869.  Register early due to limited seating.
Disclaimer Utah non-resident permit is not honored in the State of Illinois.  Illinois residents are still required to obtain an Illinois Concealed Carry permit to legally carry a concealed firearm in Illinois.
Ever wondered what the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is and whether you would benefit from implementing it on your land? The CRP program is administered by the USDA Farm Service, with technical assistance provided by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).
This program assists individuals to reduce soil erosion, enhance water supplies, improve water quality, and increase wildlife habitats. Join us in a two-hour workshop as we discuss the different types of practices available through the CRP program, cost shares and incentives, contract details and requirements, information related to CRP practices, mid-contract management practices and how producers can complete required practices.
Discussions will also cover wildlife habitat goals, buffers and pollinator habitats. University of Illinois Extension will be partnering with the Sandy Frick from the Jefferson County Farm Service Agency, Jeremy Jackman from the USDA National Resources Conservation Service, and Brady Wooten, Wildlife Biologist from Pheasants Forever, Inc., and Quail Forever.
The workshop is scheduled for October 13, from 5:30pm to 7:30pm at the Jefferson County Extension Office, 4618 Broadway, Mt. Vernon, Illinois. There will be no cost for attending the program and it is open to the public. A light meal will be served, courtesy of Pheasants Forever, Inc., and Quail Forever.
Registration is required prior to October 7, 2016. Space will be limited for this workshop, so register early. Registration information can be found at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/registration/?RegistrationID=14931.
Questions about this program can be directed to Laurie George at ljgeorge@illinois.edu, or by calling the University of Illinois Extension Office in Mt. Vernon at (618) 242-0780.
Remember we are farmers working together. If we can help let us know.

Manager’s Article September 1, 2016

GayGay Bowlin, Manager

The rain on Friday was a real gully washer. I have seen several pictures where some of the corn fields had substantial damage with the winds and then there was the hail and lightening. Seemed to come out of nowhere and left pretty quickly as well.
We had our Corn Yield Tour on Thursday before the rains hit so that was a blessing. Here are the yields that we found:
The yields listed are the yield estimates that we came up county wide.
All twelve townships in the county were checked with the help of many volunteers. Those helping to conduct the annual yield tour were: Marc Lamczyk – Program Coordinator, Agriculture with University of Illinois Extension; Seth Schlag – Facility Manager at Consolidated Grain in Barge along with Tracy Little; Tony Lamczyk – County Executive Director for Farm Service Agency; Diane Wallace – District Conservationist along with Clint Brashear, Kenneth Rexing and Adam Birkner; Larry Miller – Farm Bureau District 17 Director; Kendall Browning – District 17 Young Leader Chairman; Brad Browning – Young Leader Chairman; Melissa Lamczyk – Ag in the Classroom Coordinator; Bennie Browning – Farmer Member, Michael Browning – Young Leader, Blake Arnold – Southern FS and Gay Bowlin – Franklin County Farm Bureau Manager.
Volunteers traveled throughout the county and took between 6 and 9 samples in each township and averaged the samples taken. The fields selected were at random and were typical throughout the township.
The yields per township are listed below:
Barren 139.7
Benton 148.8
Browning 162.9
Cave 146.6
Denning  131.3
Eastern       166.1
Ewing 142.0
Frankfort 161.0
Goode 144.8
Northern 127.1
Tyrone 130.7
Six Mile 131.3
FRANKLIN COUNTY AVERAGE = 144.3
Last Wednesday, August 24, Franklin County was invited to attend am Illinois Ag Legislative Roundtable, not a debate, at a farm in Normal, Illinois. We had 5 in attendance from Franklin County. We listened to both candidates for U.S. Senate Mark Kirk and Representative Tammy Duckworth. I must say that this event was eye opening. Both candidates spoke of their support for Agriculture and the ways that they would make things work for the farmers. In my opinion I think that I would like to hear both of them in another setting.
By the time you read this we will be down to less than 70 days until the election. If you already know who you are voting for that is fine but if you do not and you are still not up on all of the issues that are being thrown around please take the time to study the issues and what the candidates are for and against. This is your future. Don’t make your decision based on one statement or on what someone tells you to do.
Remember we are farmers working together. If we can help let us know.

Franklin County Corn Yields for 2016

The Franklin County Farm Bureau held their annual Corn Yield Tour on Thursday the 25th of August.
The yields listed are the yield estimates that we came up county wide.
All twelve townships in the county were checked with the help of many volunteers. Those helping to conduct the annual yield tour were: Marc Lamczyk – Program Coordinator, Agriculture with University of Illinois Extension; Seth Schlag – Facility Manager at Consolidated Grain in Barge along with Tracy Little; Tony Lamczyk – County Executive Director for Farm Service Agency; Diane Wallace – District Conservationist along with Clint Brashear, Kenneth Rexing and Adam Birkner; Larry Miller – Farm Bureau District 17 Director; Kendall Browning – District 17 Young Leader Chairman; Brad Browning – Young Leader Chairman; Melissa Lamczyk – Ag in the Classroom Coordinator; Bennie Browning – Farmer Member, Michael Browning – Young Leader, Blake Arnold – Southern FS and Gay Bowlin – Franklin County Farm Bureau Manager.
Volunteers traveled throughout the county and took between 6 and 9 samples in each township and averaged the samples taken. The fields selected were at random and were typical throughout the township.
The yields per township are listed below:

Barren 139.7
Benton 148.8
Browning 162.9
Cave 146.6
Denning  131.3
Eastern       166.1
Ewing 142.0
Frankfort 161.0
Goode 144.8
Northern 127.1
Tyrone 130.7
Six Mile 131.3

FRANKLIN COUNTY AVERAGE = 144.3

Manager’s Article August 19, 2016

GayMonsanto Grant – Utah Concealed Carry Class – Lock Out/Tag Out
Gay Bowlin, Manager

America’s Farmers Grow Communities is an opportunity for you to send in your entry for a $2,500 Grant to be awarded to the non-for-profit of your choice. Those who are eligible to apply must not be officers, directors or employees of Monsanto or spouses or domestic partners of any of the above. You must be at least 21 years of age or older and are actively farming a minimum of 250 acres of corn, soybeans, cotton and/or 40 acres of open-field vegetables or at least 10 acres tomatoes, peppers, and/or cucumbers grown in protected culture (glasshouse, nethouse, plastic).
You can go to the website at www.growcommunities.com and submit a short application or call 1-877/267-3332. The Franklin County Farm Bureau Foundation which represents the Ag in the Classroom would greatly appreciate it if you would do this and then if you are awarded this grant just tell them that you would like for it to go to us. Again, it is a short process and if you have any questions or need any help please don’t hesitate to call the office at 435-3616.
Illinois farmers rated 83 percent of corn and 79 percent of soybeans in good to excellent condition as crops mature toward harvest, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported Tuesday.
Lock Out/Tag Out Packets available now.
What is Lock Out/Tag Out?
Tag Out protects a worker by warning others not to turn on equipment while working inside a grain bin, around augers, or servicing machinery. Tag out is a minimal safety procedure for farmers who are not subject to OSHA regulations. The best practice is to both Lock Out and Tag Out equipment. Those subject to OSHA regulations must follow the complete lockout/tagout (LOTO) standard.
How does it work?
All energy sources are disconnected and tagged in the off position. Each person involved in the work activity tags out the power so they have control of the energy source. No one else can remove the tag. The tag warns others to prevent them from accidentally turning on the equipment or machine.
When do you need to perform Tag Out?
Before entry into a grain bin
Before repairs, maintenance or service on equipment
Before any work that requires a person to place any part of their body in the point of operation.
Each packet includes 6 re-usable danger signs to write on, a dry erase marker, zip ties and instructions. Stop by the office and pick your packet up today – let’s be safe on the job.

Remember we are farmers working together. If we can help let us know.